New Jersey Criminal Defense Law Blog

With eight offices throughout New Jersey and seven (7) attorneys whose jobs are limited exclusively to representing the accused, we are a very unique commodity in New Jersey. At the Law Offices of John F. Marshall, we defend individuals throughout New Jersey who have been arrested for drug, theft, assault, weapon, sex crime, fraud or domestic violence violations. We also provide criminal defense to those charged with disorderly persons offenses, DWI and motor vehicle charges in Municipal Court. The firm is comprised of a team of criminal attorneys with over 100 years experience. Jonathan F. Marshall and several other attorneys in the firm are former prosecutors and award winning defense lawyers. Mr. Marshall is included among the Top 100 Trial Lawyers by the National Trial Lawyers Association, was named one of the Top 10 Defense Lawyers in New Jersey by the National Academy of Criminal Defense Attorneys, and is among the Ten Leaders in both Criminal Defense & DWI in New Jersey. He and other members of his criminal firm appear in print and television media as legal consultants and commentators because of their knowledge and experience in criminal defense. The attorneys at the firm are ready to turn their attention and resources to you so that the best outcome can be reached in your case.

Recent Criminal Law Articles

  • Did Teresa Giudice Really Get A Reduced Jail Sentence?

    There is little doubt that the tabloids try to hype up information, especially when it comes to reality stars. Knowing this to be the case, I immediately questioned whether Teresa Giudice actually received a reduced sentence like what was portrayed in the press or whether the release date simply took into account jail credit for good behavior. The Honorable Esther Salas imposed a federal prison Continue Reading...

    The Constitutionality of Roadblocks in DWI Cases

    We are frequently asked about the constitutionality (legality) of roadblocks which result in DWI charges in New Jersey. The constitutionality of police roadblocks was addressed in the 1979 United States Supreme Court case of Delaware v. Prouse, 440 U.S. 648 (1979). In Prouse, the Supreme Court held that it was unconstitutional to stop and detain a driver absent articulable suspicion that a Continue Reading...

    Fourth Amendment Rights and Warrantless Searches

    For a 4th Amendment violation to occur, there must be government conduct. This usually occurs through police actions. Also, some items are so public in nature that they do not carry a reasonable expectation of privacy. Generally, garbage, bank accounts, and odors emanating from your luggage are public in nature and do not implicate 4th amendment protection. If the person has a reasonable Continue Reading...

    The Exclusionary Rule and the “Fruit of the Poisonous Tree” Doctrine

    The “Fruit of the Poisonous Tree Doctrine” is a famous evidentiary legal doctrine that has been publicized on television and in the movies. This doctrine is based upon “The Exclusionary Rule”, an important evidence doctrine that requires that the victim of an illegal search or a coerced confession can have the product of the illegality excluded from criminal prosecution. This exclusionary rule has Continue Reading...

    Miranda Rights of Criminal Defendants

    The right to remain silent and the right to counsel are implied rights grounded in the self-incrimination clause of the 5th amendment. The landmark case of Miranda v. Arizona was decided by the United States Supreme Court in 1966 which held that statements obtained from defendants during incommunicado interrogation in police-dominated atmosphere, without full warning of constitutional rights, were Continue Reading...